Tasks

Task 37, Extreme Fast Charging

Task 37, Extreme Fast Charging

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Completed Tasks

Contact for further information:

Operating Agent
Mr. Steven Boyd
Vehicle Technologies Office, United States Department of Energy
1000 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC 20585, USA
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Programme of Work

Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) have continued to increase their market share worldwide, with advantages in efficiency, low operating costs, and emissions. However despite decreases in cost within the BEV powertrain and significant improvements in drivability and performance, the BEV market still accounts for a small share of new vehicle sales annually. An identified gap to wider adoption of BEVs is the ability to refuel quickly or to fast charge. The majority of BEV recharging is done at home, but data shows that having access to public direct current (DC) fast chargers can have a big impact on BEV utility from a consumer perspective. Studies have shown that in areas where drivers have access to 50-kW or 120-kW fast charge stations, annual electric vehicle (EV) miles traveled increased by over 25 %, even in cases where fast charging was used for 1 % to 5 % of total charging events. Having access to these fast charge stations can help alleviate the "range anxiety" commonly cited as a reason for consumer hesitation to buy a BEV.

Based on these trends, even higher power charging stations could drive further BEV adoption. To address the fast charge barrier, charging at power levels up to and even exceeding 400 kW, often referred to as extreme fast charging (XFC), have been proposed. This task focuses on XFC technology, gaps, installations, and operations.

Task 37 is focusing on the following objectives: investigating station siting - what factors are considered (i.e. space requirements, city center, community/corridor, etc.); quantifying the costs of installation - including physical site location and infrastructure costs as well as costs associated with the charging equipment; documenting grid connection details for current and planned installations, including any co-located renewable generation or energy storage; understanding the implications of XFC on battery design, performance, and cost; documenting pay structures and/or consumer interfaces for payment; and studying consumer education methods and topics.

It is generally accepted that for XFC to be successful, charging stations should be able to recharge a BEV in less than 10 minutes and provide approximately 200 additional miles of driving. However, this introduces a host of new challenges that need to be addressed. As a result, it is expected that packs designed to meet XFC will initially be significantly more expensive than BEVs optimized for current charging technology. From the battery cell to the power grid these 400-kW chargers are connected to, this research outlined in the report discusses issues that need to be addressed at each level in order to implement a 400-kW charging network.

Working Method

Task 37 is working to finalize member countries at this point, and is currently reporting out XFC related activities and reports from the United States. The task plans to organize a series of workshops scheduled in conjunction with dedicated conferences and HEV TCP Executive Committee (ExCo) meetings. The workshops will gather a variety of stakeholders coming from academia, industry and public authorities. Workshops may also include site visits to XFC installations, providers, or manufacturers. The purpose is to identify trends and scenarios, to analyze challenges and opportunities, and to deliver conclusions for future actions. For XFC to be successful, stations should be able to recharge BEVs in less than 10 minutes and provide approximately 200 additional miles of driving for each vehicle. However, this introduces a host of new challenges that need to be addressed. As a result, it is expected that packs designed to meet XFC will initially be significantly more expensive than those for BEVs optimized for current charging technology.

Member countries

Currently, the United States is coordinating the task. New members are encouraged to apply. For more information, please contact the Operating Agent.